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Less screen time and more frequent vigorous physical activity is associated with lower risk of reporting negative mental health symptoms among Icelandic adolescents

Less screen time and more frequent vigorous physical activity is associated with lower risk of reporting negative mental health symptoms among Icelandic adolescents


Title: Less screen time and more frequent vigorous physical activity is associated with lower risk of reporting negative mental health symptoms among Icelandic adolescents
Author: Hrafnkelsdóttir, Soffía M.
Brychta, Robert J.
Rögnvaldsdóttir, Vaka   orcid.org/0000-0003-4244-3152
Gestsdottir, Sunna   orcid.org/0000-0002-6252-0453
Chen, Kong Y.
Jóhannsson, Erlingur Sigurður
Guðmundsdóttir, Sigriður Lára
Arngrímsson, Sigurbjörn Árni
Date: 2018-04-26
Language: English
Scope: e0196286
University/Institute: Háskóli Íslands
University of Iceland
School: Menntavísindasvið (HÍ)
School of Education (UI)
Department: Rannsóknarstofa í íþrótta- og heilsufræði (HÍ)
Research Centre for Sport and Health Science (UI)
Series: Plos One;13(4)
ISSN: 1932-6203
DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0196286
Subject: Physical activity; Mental health and psychiatry; Health screening; Depression; Adolescents; Anxiety; Adipose tissue; Schools; Hreyfing (heilsurækt); Líðan; Þunglyndi; Unglingsár; Kvíði; Skjánotkun
URI: https://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11815/976

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Citation:

Hrafnkelsdottir, S. M., Brychta, R. J., Rognvaldsdottir, V., Gestsdottir, S., Chen, K. Y., Johannsson, E., . . . Arngrimsson, S. A. (2018). Less screen time and more frequent vigorous physical activity is associated with lower risk of reporting negative mental health symptoms among Icelandic adolescents. PLoS One, 13(4), e0196286. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0196286

Abstract:

Objective Few studies have explored the potential interrelated associations of screen time and physical activity with mental health in youth, particularly using objective methods. We examined cross-sectional associations of these variables among Icelandic adolescents, using objective and subjective measurements of physical activity. Methods Data were collected in the spring of 2015 from 315 tenth grade students (mean age 15.8 years) in six elementary schools in metropolitan Reykjavík, Iceland. Participants reported, via questionnaire, on demographics, weekly frequency of vigorous physical activity, daily hours of screen time and mental health status (symptoms of depression, anxiety and somatic complaints, self-esteem and life satisfaction). Total physical activity was measured over one week with wrist-worn accelerometers. Body composition was determined by DXA-scanning. Poisson regression analysis was used to explore independent and interactive associations of screen time and physical activity with mental health variables, adjusting for gender, body fat percentage and maternal education. Results Less screen time (below the group median of 5.3 h/day) and more frequent vigorous physical activity (≥4x/week) were each associated with reporting fewer symptoms of depression, anxiety, low self-esteem, and life dissatisfaction. No significant associations were observed between objectively measured physical activity and mental health outcomes. Interactive regression analysis showed that the group reporting both less screen time and more frequent vigorous physical activity had the lowest risk of reporting symptoms of depression, anxiety, low self-esteem, and life dissatisfaction. Conclusions Reports of less screen time and more frequent vigorous physical activity were associated with lower risk of reporting mental health problems among Icelandic adolescents. Those who reported a combination of engaging in less screen time and more frequent vigorous physical activity had the lowest risk, suggesting a synergistic relationship between the two behaviors on mental health outcomes. Our results support guiding youth towards more active and less sedentary/screen-based lifestyle.

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