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Interactions between boldness, foraging performance and behavioural plasticity across social contexts

Interactions between boldness, foraging performance and behavioural plasticity across social contexts


Titill: Interactions between boldness, foraging performance and behavioural plasticity across social contexts
Höfundur: Ólafsdóttir, Guðbjörg Ásta   orcid.org/0000-0002-2814-9160
Magellan, Kit
Útgáfa: 2016-08-04
Tungumál: Enska
Umfang: 1-11
Háskóli/Stofnun: Háskóli Íslands
University of Iceland
Svið: Stofnun rannsóknasetra (HÍ)
University of Iceland Institute of Regional Research Centres (UI)
Deild: Rannsóknasetur á Vestfjörðum (HÍ)
University of Iceland Research Centre of the Westfjords (UI)
ISSN: 0340-5443 (Print)
1432-0762 (Online)
DOI: DOI: 10.1007/s00265-016-2193-0
Efnisorð: Cognitive style; Threespine stickleback; Behavioural plasticity; Boldness; Audience effect; Speed-accuracy trade off
URI: https://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11815/58

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Tilvitnun:

Ólafsdóttir, G.Á. & Magellan, K. "Interactions between boldness, foraging performance and behavioural plasticity across social contexts." Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology (2016). doi:10.1007/s00265-016-2193-0

Útdráttur:

Boldness, the tendency to be explorative, risk prone and proactive, often varies consistently between individuals. An individual’s position on the boldness–shyness continuum has many implications. Bold individuals may outperform shyer conspecifics during foraging as they cover more ground, accumulate information more rapidly and make more frequent food discoveries. Individual variation in boldness may also affect behavioural plasticity across environmental contexts, as the time to process new information, the ability to locate and memorise resources and the time and ability to apply prior information in a novel context all differ between individuals. The primary aim of the current study was to examine plasticity in, and covariation between, boldness, foraging speed and foraging accuracy across social foraging contexts. We showed that the stickleback that were shyest when foraging alone became relatively boldest when foraging in a social context and also delayed their entry to a known food patch the most in the presence of conspecifics. These results support the assertion that shyer foragers are more reactive to social cues and add to current knowledge of how an individual’s position on the boldness–shyness continuum may correlate to foraging task performance and behavioural plasticity. We conclude that the correlation between boldness and behavioural plasticity may have broad relevance as the ability to adjust or retain behaviours in changing social environments could often have consequences for fitness.

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