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Social trauma and its association with posttraumatic stress disorder and social anxiety disorder

Social trauma and its association with posttraumatic stress disorder and social anxiety disorder


Title: Social trauma and its association with posttraumatic stress disorder and social anxiety disorder
Author: Bjornsson, Andri   orcid.org/0000-0003-0307-2512
Harðarson, Jóhann P.
Valdimarsdóttir, Auður G.
Guðmundsdóttir, Karen
Tryggvadóttir, Arnrún
Þórarinsdóttir, Kristjana A.
Wessman, Inga   orcid.org/0000-0002-2609-5664
Sigurjónsdóttir, Ólafía
Davíðsdóttir, Sóley
Þórisdóttir, Auður Sjöfn
Date: 2020-05
Language: English
Scope: 102228
University/Institute: Háskóli Íslands
University of Iceland
School: Heilbrigðisvísindasvið (HÍ)
School of Health Sciences (UI)
Department: Sálfræðideild (HÍ)
Faculty of Psychology (UI)
Series: Journal of Anxiety Disorders;72
ISSN: 0887-6185
DOI: 10.1016/j.janxdis.2020.102228
Subject: Obsessive-compulsive disorder; Posttraumatic stress disorder; Social anxiety disorder; Social threat; Social trauma; Áráttu- og þráhyggjuröskun; Félagsfælni; Áfallastreita
URI: https://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11815/2367

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Citation:

Bjornsson, A. S., et al. (2020). "Social trauma and its association with posttraumatic stress disorder and social anxiety disorder." Journal of Anxiety Disorders 72: 102228.

Abstract:

The key characteristic of a traumatic event as defined by the Diagnostic and Mental Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM) seems to be a threat to life. However, evidence suggests that other types of threats may play a role in the development of PTSD and other disorders such as social anxiety disorder (SAD). One such threat is social trauma, which involves humiliation and rejection in social situations. In this study, we explored whether there were differences in the frequency, type and severity of social trauma endured by individuals with a primary diagnosis of SAD (n = 60) compared to a clinical control group of individuals with a primary diagnosis of obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD, n = 19) and a control group of individuals with no psychiatric disorders (n = 60). The results showed that most participants in this study had experienced social trauma. There were no clear differences in the types of experiences between the groups. However, one third of participants in the SAD group (but none in the other groups) met criteria for PTSD or suffered from clinically significant PTSD symptoms in response to their most significant social trauma. This group of SAD patients described more severe social trauma than other participants. This line of research could have implications for theoretical models of both PTSD and SAD, and for the treatment of individuals with SAD suffering from PTSD after social trauma.

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This is an open access article under the CC BY-NC-ND license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/BY-NC-ND/4.0/).

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