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High Migratory Survival and Highly Variable Migratory Behavior in Black-Tailed Godwits

High Migratory Survival and Highly Variable Migratory Behavior in Black-Tailed Godwits


Title: High Migratory Survival and Highly Variable Migratory Behavior in Black-Tailed Godwits
Author: Senner, Nathan R.
Verhoeven, Mo A.
Abad-Gómez, José M.
Alves, Jose   orcid.org/0000-0001-7182-0936
Hooijmeijer, Jos Corstiaan Elbert Wouter
Howison, Ruth A.
Kentie, Rosemarie   orcid.org/0000-0001-7050-9265
Loonstra, A. H.Jelle
Masero, Jose A.   orcid.org/0000-0001-5318-4833
Rocha, Afonso D.
... 2 more authors Show all authors
Date: 2019-04-09
Language: English
Scope: 96
University/Institute: Háskóli Íslands
University of Iceland
Department: Rannsóknasetur Suðurlandi (HÍ)
Research Centre in South Iceland (UI)
Series: Frontiers in Ecology and Evolution;7(APR)
ISSN: 2296-701X
DOI: 10.3389/fevo.2019.00096
Subject: Repeatability; Phenotypic flexibility; Seasonal survival; Migration; Annual cycle; Far dýra; Árstíðasveiflur; Vistfræði
URI: https://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11815/2090

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Citation:

Senner, N. R., et al. (2019). "High Migratory Survival and Highly Variable Migratory Behavior in Black-Tailed Godwits." 7(96).

Abstract:

Few studies have been able to directly measure the seasonal survival rates of migratory species or determine how variable the timing of migration is within individuals and across populations over multiple years. As such, it remains unclear how likely migration is to affect the population dynamics of migratory species and how capable migrants may be of responding to changing environmental conditions within their lifetimes. To address these questions, we used three types of tracking devices to track individual black-tailed godwits from the nominate subspecies (Limosa limosa limosa) throughout their annual cycles for up to 5 consecutive years. We found that godwits exhibit considerable inter- and intra-individual variation in their migratory behavior across years. We also found that godwits had generally high survival rates during migration, although survival was reduced during northward flights across the Sahara Desert. These patterns differ from those observed in most other migratory species, suggesting that migration may only be truly dangerous when crossing geographic barriers that lack emergency stopover sites and that the levels of phenotypic flexibility exhibited by some populations may enable them to rapidly respond to changing environmental conditions.

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This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY). The use, distribution or reproduction in other forums is permitted, provided the original author(s) and the copyright owner(s) are credited and that the original publication in this journal is cited, in accordance with accepted academic practice. No use, distribution or reproduction is permitted which does not comply with these terms.

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