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Human papillomavirus types in cervical high-grade lesions or cancer among Nordic women-Potential for prevention

Human papillomavirus types in cervical high-grade lesions or cancer among Nordic women-Potential for prevention


Title: Human papillomavirus types in cervical high-grade lesions or cancer among Nordic women-Potential for prevention
Author: Dovey de la Cour, Cecilie
Guleria, Sonia
Nygård, Mari
Tryggvadottir, Laufey   orcid.org/0000-0001-8067-9030
Sigurdsson, Kristjan   orcid.org/0000-0002-5470-3006
Liaw, Kaili
Hortlund, Maria   orcid.org/0000-0002-2627-4451
Lagheden, Camilla
Hansen, Bo Terning   orcid.org/0000-0003-2765-4488
Munk, Christian
... 2 more authors Show all authors
Date: 2019-01-11
Language: English
Scope: 839-849
University/Institute: Háskóli Íslands
University of Iceland
School: Heilbrigðisvísindasvið (HÍ)
School of Health Sciences (UI)
Department: Læknadeild (HÍ)
Faculty of Medicine (UI)
Series: Cancer Medicine;8(2)
ISSN: 2045-7634
DOI: 10.1002/cam4.1961
Subject: Cervical cancer; Cervical intraepithelial neoplasia; Human papillomavirus; Nordic countries; Prevalence; Leghálskrabbamein; Veirur; Tíðni; Norðurlönd
URI: https://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11815/1811

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Citation:

Dovey de la Cour, C, Guleria, S, Nygård, M, et al. Human papillomavirus types in cervical high‐grade lesions or cancer among Nordic women—Potential for prevention. Cancer Medicine. 2019; 8: 839– 849. https://doi.org/10.1002/cam4.1961

Abstract:

It is valuable to establish a population‐based prevaccination baseline distribution of human papillomavirus (HPV) types among women with high‐grade cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) grade 2 or 3 and cervical cancer in order to assess the potential impact of HPV vaccination. In four countries (Denmark, Norway, Sweden, and Iceland), we collected consecutive series of cervical cancers (n = 639) and high‐grade precancerous cervical lesions (n = 1240) during 2004‐2006 before implementation of HPV vaccination and subjected the specimens to standardized HPV genotyping. The HPV prevalence was 82.7% (95% confidence interval [CI] 79.0‐86.4) in CIN2, 91.6% (95% CI 89.7‐93.5) in CIN3, and 86.4% (95% CI 83.7‐89.1) in cervical cancer. The most common HPV types in CIN2/3 were HPV16 (CIN2: 35.9%, 95% CI 31.2‐40.6; CIN3: 50.2%, 95% CI 46.8‐53.6) and HPV31 (CIN2: 10.9%, 95% CI 7.8‐13.9; CIN3: 12.1%, 95% CI 9.9‐14.3), while HPV16 and HPV18 were the most frequent types in cervical cancer (48.8%, 95% CI 44.9‐52.7 and 15.3%, 95% CI 12.5‐18.1, respectively). The prevalence of HPV16/18 decreased with increasing age at diagnosis in both CIN2/3 and cervical cancer (P < 0.0001). Elimination of HPV16/18 by vaccination is predicted to prevent 42% (95% CI 37.0‐46.7) of CIN2, 57% (95% CI 53.8‐60.5) of CIN3 and 64% (95% CI 60.3‐67.7) of cervical cancer. Prevention of the five additional HPV types HPV31/33/45/52/58 would increase the protection to 68% (95% CI 63.0‐72.2) in CIN2, 85% (95% CI 82.4‐87.2) in CIN3 and 80% (95% CI 77.0‐83.2) in cervical cancer. This study provides large‐scale and representative baselines for assessing and evaluating the population‐based preventive impact of HPV vaccination.

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This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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