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Age at first birth in women is genetically associated with increased risk of schizophrenia

Age at first birth in women is genetically associated with increased risk of schizophrenia


Title: Age at first birth in women is genetically associated with increased risk of schizophrenia
Author: Sigurdsson, Engilbert   orcid.org/0000-0001-9404-7982
Date: 2018-07-05
Language: English
Scope: 10168
University/Institute: Háskóli Íslands
University of Iceland
Series: Scientific Reports;8(1)
ISSN: 2045-2322
DOI: 10.1038/s41598-018-28160-z
Subject: Genetic association study; Schizophrenia; Erfðarannsóknir; Geðklofi
URI: https://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11815/1605

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Citation:

Ni, G., Gratten, J., Wray, N.R. et al. Age at first birth in women is genetically associated with increased risk of schizophrenia. Sci Rep 8, 10168 (2018). https://doi.org/10.1038/s41598-018-28160-z

Abstract:

Previous studies have shown an increased risk for mental health problems in children born to both younger and older parents compared to children of average-aged parents. We previously used a novel design to reveal a latent mechanism of genetic association between schizophrenia and age at first birth in women (AFB). Here, we use independent data from the UK Biobank (N = 38,892) to replicate the finding of an association between predicted genetic risk of schizophrenia and AFB in women, and to estimate the genetic correlation between schizophrenia and AFB in women stratified into younger and older groups. We find evidence for an association between predicted genetic risk of schizophrenia and AFB in women (P-value = 1.12E-05), and we show genetic heterogeneity between younger and older AFB groups (P-value = 3.45E-03). The genetic correlation between schizophrenia and AFB in the younger AFB group is −0.16 (SE = 0.04) while that between schizophrenia and AFB in the older AFB group is 0.14 (SE = 0.08). Our results suggest that early, and perhaps also late, age at first birth in women is associated with increased genetic risk for schizophrenia in the UK Biobank sample. These findings contribute new insights into factors contributing to the complex bio-social risk architecture underpinning the association between parental age and offspring mental health.

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Open Access This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article’s Creative Commons license and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.

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