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Letter-Sound Knowledge: Exploring Gender Differences in Children When They Start School Regarding Knowledge of Large Letters, Small Letters, Sound Large Letters, and Sound Small Letters

Letter-Sound Knowledge: Exploring Gender Differences in Children When They Start School Regarding Knowledge of Large Letters, Small Letters, Sound Large Letters, and Sound Small Letters


Title: Letter-Sound Knowledge: Exploring Gender Differences in Children When They Start School Regarding Knowledge of Large Letters, Small Letters, Sound Large Letters, and Sound Small Letters
Author: Sigmundsson, Hermundur   orcid.org/0000-0003-2333-5711
Eriksen, Adrian D.
Ofteland, Greta Storm
Haga, Monika   orcid.org/0000-0002-3198-4351
Date: 2017-09-08
Language: English
Scope: 1539
University/Institute: Háskólinn í Reykjavík
Reykjavik University
School: Tækni- og verkfræðideild (HR)
School of Science and Engineering (RU)
Department: Íþróttafræði (HR)
Sport Science (RU)
Series: Frontiers in Psychology;
ISSN: 1664-1078 (eISSN)
DOI: 10.3389/fpsyg.2017.01539
Subject: Children; Gender differences; Letter-sound knowledge; Börn; Kynjamunur; Hljóðkerfisvitund
URI: https://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11815/1405

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Citation:

Sigmundsson, H., Eriksen, A. D., Ofteland, G. S., & Haga, M. (2017). Letter-Sound Knowledge: Exploring Gender Differences in Children When They Start School Regarding Knowledge of Large Letters, Small Letters, Sound Large Letters, and Sound Small Letters. Frontiers in Psychology, 8, 1539. https://doi.org/10.3389/fpsyg.2017.01539

Abstract:

This study explored whether there is a gender difference in letter-sound knowledge when children start at school. 485 children aged 5-6 years completed assessment of letter-sound knowledge, i.e., large letters; sound of large letters; small letters; sound of small letters. The findings indicate a significant difference between girls and boys in all four factors tested in this study in favor of the girls. There are still no clear explanations to the basis of a presumed gender difference in letter-sound knowledge. That the findings have origin in neuro-biological factors cannot be excluded, however, the fact that girls probably have been exposed to more language experience/stimulation compared to boys, lends support to explanations derived from environmental aspects.

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This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY). The use, distribution or reproduction in other forums is permitted, provided the original author(s) or licensor are credited and that the original publication in this journal is cited, in accordance with accepted academic practice. No use, distribution or reproduction is permitted which does not comply with these terms.

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