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Project ethics: The Critical Path to Project Success - applying an ethical risk assessment tool to a large infrastructure project

Project ethics: The Critical Path to Project Success - applying an ethical risk assessment tool to a large infrastructure project


Title: Project ethics: The Critical Path to Project Success - applying an ethical risk assessment tool to a large infrastructure project
Author: Ingason, Helgi Thor
Jonasson, Haukur Ingi
Date: 2018-06-12
Language: English
Scope: 1-12
University/Institute: Háskólinn í Reykjavík
Reykjavik University
School: Tækni- og verkfræðideild (HR)
School of Science and Engineering (RU)
Series: International Project Management Association Research Conference;2018
DOI: 10.5130/pmrp.ipmarc2017.5639
Subject: Project management; Ethics; Risk management; Verkefnastjórnun; Siðfræði; Áhættustjórnun
URI: https://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11815/1342

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Citation:

Ingason, H. T. and Jonasson, H. I. 2018. Project ethics: The Critical Path to Project Success - applying an ethical risk assessment tool to a large infrastructure project. International Project Management Association Research Conference 2017, UTS ePRESS, Sydney: NSW, pp. 1-12. https:// doi.org/10.5130/pmrp. ipmarc2017.5639

Abstract:

A project ethics tool was applied to review a major infrastructure project in Iceland. The tool is based on the four principles of “virtue” based ethics, “utility” based ethics, “duty” based ethics and “rights” based ethics. The tool uses perspectives of five key stakeholders: “the project leader, the project team, the project organization, the society in which the project is based, and future generations that the project might influence”. New ethical aspects of the project were discovered, which has led to a more ethically mature consideration of projects within the company. An ethical risk assessment is a valuable add-on to the more conventional engineering risk assessments usually performed in projects of this sort. Furthermore, the tool helps to expand the horizon when defining success by looking at projects from the perspectives of distinct clusters of stakeholders, whom we can better understand by applying the four ethical theories.

Rights:

© 2018 by the author(s). This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International (CC BY 4.0) License (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), allowing third parties to copy and redistribute the material in any medium or format and to remix, transform, and build upon the material for any purpose, even commercially, provided the original work is properly cited and states its license.

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