Opin vísindi

The impact of an exercise training intervention on cortisol levels and post-traumatic stress disorder in juveniles from an Ugandan refugee settlement: study protocol for a randomized control trial

Show simple item record

dc.contributor Háskólinn í Reykjavík
dc.contributor Reykjavik University
dc.contributor.author Budde, Henning
dc.contributor.author Akko, Davin P.
dc.contributor.author Ainamani, Herbert E.
dc.contributor.author Murillo-Rodríguez, Eric
dc.contributor.author Weierstall, Roland
dc.date.accessioned 2019-10-31T10:52:27Z
dc.date.available 2019-10-31T10:52:27Z
dc.date.issued 2018-07-09
dc.identifier.citation Budde, H., Akko, D. P., Ainamani, H. E., Murillo-Rodríguez, E., & Weierstall, R. (2018). The impact of an exercise training intervention on cortisol levels and post-traumatic stress disorder in juveniles from an Ugandan refugee settlement: Study protocol for a randomized control trial. Trials, 19(1), 364. https://doi.org/10.1186/s13063-018-2753-x
dc.identifier.issn 1745-6215 (eISSN)
dc.identifier.uri https://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11815/1324
dc.description.abstract Background:Latest research demonstrates a significant improvement in stress-related symptoms in psychological disorders as a result of exercise training (ET). Controlled clinical trials further validate the significance of ET by demonstrating lower salivary cortisol levels in patients with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) after intervention. A significant change in cortisol and dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) levels can already be found after an 8–12-week ET program. The proposed study aims to investigate the impact of an 8-week ET on PTSD symptoms and changes in cortisol levels in a juvenile refugee sample from the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) at an Ugandan refugee settlement. It is the first to implement an ET intervention in a resource-poor, post-conflict setting.Methods/design:In a randomized controlled trial, 198 adolescent participants aged 13–16 years from the DRC who, suffer from PTSD, will be investigated. The participants are based at the Nakivale refugee settlement, an official refugee camp in Uganda, Africa, which is among the largest in the world. The participants will be randomized into an Exercise Training (ET )group with a maximum heart rate (HRmax) of > 60%, an Alternative Intervention (AI) group with low-level exercises, and a Waiting-list Control (WC) group. After the 8-week interventional phase, changes in cortisol awakening response (CAR) and DHEA in the ET group that correspond to an improvement in PTSD symptoms are expected that remain at follow-up after 3 months.Discussion:To date, there is no controlled and reliable longitudinal study examining the effects of an ET program on symptom severity in individuals with PTSD that can be explained with a harmonization of cortisol secretion. The presented study design introduces an intervention that can be implemented with little expenditure. It aims to provide a promising low-threshold and cost-effective treatment approach for the application in resource-poor settings.
dc.description.sponsorship Currently, Henning Budde is supported by the German Research Foundation (DFG, Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft); BU 1837/5-1, BU 1837/5-2.
dc.format.extent 364
dc.language.iso en
dc.publisher Springer Science and Business Media LLC
dc.relation.ispartofseries Trials;19(1)
dc.rights info:eu-repo/semantics/openAccess
dc.subject Medicine (miscellaneous)
dc.subject Pharmacology (medical)
dc.subject Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD)
dc.subject Exercise training
dc.subject Juvenile refugees
dc.subject Cortisol
dc.subject Dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA)
dc.subject Hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis
dc.subject Áfallastreita
dc.subject Þjálfun
dc.subject Flóttamenn
dc.subject Unglingar
dc.subject Hormónar
dc.subject Taugaboð
dc.title The impact of an exercise training intervention on cortisol levels and post-traumatic stress disorder in juveniles from an Ugandan refugee settlement: study protocol for a randomized control trial
dc.type info:eu-repo/semantics/article
dcterms.license © The Author(s). 2018 Open Access. This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link tothe Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver(http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated.
dc.description.version Peer Reviewed
dc.identifier.doi 10.1186/s13063-018-2753-x
dc.contributor.department Íþróttafræði (HR)
dc.contributor.department Sport Science (RU)
dc.contributor.school Tækni- og verkfræðideild (HR)
dc.contributor.school School of Science and Engineering (RU)


Files in this item

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record