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Browsing by Subject "Eldfjallafræði"

Browsing by Subject "Eldfjallafræði"

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  • Askew, Robert Alexander (University of Iceland, School of Engineering and Natural Sciences, Faculty of Earth Sciences, 2020-01)
    The Breiðdalur volcanic system, eastern Iceland, comprises of a ~600 km3 central volcano, a 30 - 40 km long dyke swarm and plateau basalts erupted from this dyke swarm. The entire volcanic system was active from 10.1 to 7.8 Ma, the central volcano was ...
  • Berkesi, Márta; Bali, Eniko; Bodnar, Robert J.; Szabó, Ábel; Guzmics, Tibor (Elsevier BV, 2020-09)
    Oldoinyo Lengai, located in the Gregory Rift in Tanzania, is a world-famous volcano owing to its uniqueness in producing natrocarbonatite melts and because of its extremely high CO2 flux. The volcano is constructed of highly peralkaline [PI = molar ...
  • Dürig, Tobias; White, J. D. L.; Murch, A. P.; Zimanowski, B.; Büttner, R.; Mele, D.; Dellino, P.; Carey, R. J.; Schmidt, L. S.; Spitznagel, N. (Springer Science and Business Media LLC, 2020-06-29)
    The majority of Earth’s volcanic eruptions occur beneath the sea, but the limited number of direct observations and samples limits our understanding of these unseen events. Subaerial eruptions lend some insight, but direct extrapolation from the subaerial ...
  • Dürig, Tobias; White, J. D. L.; Zimanowski, B.; Büttner, R.; Murch, A.; Carey, R. J. (Springer Science and Business Media LLC, 2020-09-30)
    In 2012, the eruption of deep-sea volcano Havre produced an abundance of fine ash at a depth of ~ 1000 m below sea level. In this study the 2D shapes of Havre ash grains retrieved from the seafloor were compared quantitatively with those of particles ...
  • Moreland, William (University of Iceland, School of Engineering and Natural Sciences, Faculty of Earth Sciences, 2017-07-14)
    The 10th century Eldgjá flood lava eruption, southern Iceland, was the most voluminous eruption on Earth in the last 1100 years, erupting up to 21.0 km3 of transitional alkali basaltic magma of rather uniform composition. While 19.7 km3 was erupted as ...
  • Pedersen, Gro; Höskuldsson, Ármann; Dürig, Tobias; Thordarson, Thorvaldur; Jonsdottir, Ingibjorg; Riishus, M. S.; Óskarsson, B.V.; Dumont, Stéphanie; Magnússon, Eyjólfur; Gudmundsson, Magnus Tumi; Sigmundsson, Freysteinn; Drouin, V.J.P.B.; Gallagher, C.; Askew, R.; Gudnason, J.; Moreland, William; Nikkola, P.; Reynolds, Hannah Iona; Schmith, Johanne (Elsevier BV, 2017-06)
    The 6-month long eruption at Holuhraun (August 2014–February 2015) in the Bárðarbunga-Veiðivötn volcanic system was the largest effusive eruption in Iceland since the 1783–1784 CE Laki eruption. The lava flow field covered ~84 km2 and has an estimated ...
  • Caudron, Corentin; White, Robert S.; Green, Robert G.; Woods, Jennifer; Agustsdottir, Thorbjorg; Donaldson, Clare; Greenfield, Tim; Rivalta, Eleonora; Brandsdóttir, Bryndís (American Geophysical Union (AGU), 2018-01)
    Magma is transported in brittle rock through dikes and sills. This movement may be accompanied by the release of seismic energy that can be tracked from the Earth's surface. Locating dikes and deciphering their dynamics is therefore of prime importance ...
  • Reynolds, Hannah Iona (University of Iceland, School of Engineering and Natural Sciences, Faculty of Earth Sciences, 2017-12-18)
    Thermal anomalies are observed at many volcanoes, resulting from geothermal and magmatic activity, and are usually difficult to quantify since the measurement of heat fluxes from the ground to the atmosphere is subject to large uncertainties. However, ...
  • Schmith, Johanne (PhD-defence at University of Copenhagen, 2017-08-25)
    Iceland is one of the most active terrestrial volcanic regions on Earth with an average of more than 20 eruptions per century. Around 80% of all events are tephra generating explosive eruptions, but less than 10 % of all known tephra layers have been ...