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Adverse childhood experiences and resilience among adult women : A population-based study

Adverse childhood experiences and resilience among adult women : A population-based study


Title: Adverse childhood experiences and resilience among adult women : A population-based study
Author: Daníelsdóttir, Hilda Björk
Aspelund, Thor   orcid.org/0000-0002-7998-5433
Thordardottir, Edda Bjork
Fall, Katja   orcid.org/0000-0002-3649-2639
Fang, Fang
Tómasson, Gunnar
Rúnarsdóttir, Harpa
Yang, Qian
Choi, Karmel W
Kennedy, Beatrice
... 6 more authors Show all authors
Date: 2022-02-01
Language: English
Scope:
Department: Interdisciplinary Graduate Studies
Faculty of Medicine
Internal Medicine and Emergency Services
Series: eLife; 11()
ISSN: 2050-084X
DOI: https://doi.org/10.7554/ELIFE.71770
Subject: Adaptation, Psychological; Adolescent; Adult; Adult Survivors of Child Abuse/psychology; Adverse Childhood Experiences/psychology; Aged; Cross-Sectional Studies; Female; Humans; Iceland/epidemiology; Linear Models; Middle Aged; Prevalence; Resilience, Psychological; Risk Factors; Self Report; Social Support; Socioeconomic Factors; Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/epidemiology; Young Adult; Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology (all); Immunology and Microbiology (all); Neuroscience (all)
URI: https://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11815/3342

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Citation:

Daníelsdóttir , H B , Aspelund , T , Thordardottir , E B , Fall , K , Fang , F , Tómasson , G , Rúnarsdóttir , H , Yang , Q , Choi , K W , Kennedy , B , Halldorsdottir , T , Lu , D , Song , H , Jakobsdóttir , J , Hauksdóttir , A & Valdimarsdóttir , U A 2022 , ' Adverse childhood experiences and resilience among adult women : A population-based study ' , eLife , vol. 11 , e71770 . https://doi.org/10.7554/ELIFE.71770

Abstract:

Background: Adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) have consistently been associated with elevated risk of multiple adverse health outcomes, yet their contribution to coping ability and psychiatric resilience in adulthood is unclear. Methods: Cross-sectional data were derived from the ongoing Stress-And-Gene-Analysis cohort, representing 30% of the Icelandic nationwide female population, 18-69 years. Participants in the current study were 26,198 women with data on 13 ACEs measured with the ACE-International Questionnaire. Self-reported coping ability was measured with the Connor-Davidson Resilience Scale and psychiatric resilience was operationalized as absence of psychiatric morbidity. Generalized linear regression assuming normal or Poisson distribution were used to assess the associations of ACEs with coping ability and psychiatric resilience controlling for multiple confounders. Results: Number of ACEs was inversely associated with adult resilience in a dose-dependent manner; every 1SD unit increase in ACE scores was associated with both lower levels of coping ability ( β = -0.14; 95% CI-0.15,-0.13) and lower psychiatric resilience ( β = -0.28; 95% CI-0.29,-0.27) in adulthood. Compared to women with 0 ACEs, women with ≥5 ACEs had 36% lower prevalence of high coping ability (PR = 0.64, 95% CI 0.59,0.70) and 58% lower prevalence of high psychiatric resilience (PR = 0.42; 95% CI 0.39,0.45). Specific ACEs including emotional neglect, bullying, sexual abuse and mental illness of household member were consistently associated with reduced adult resilience. We observed only slightly attenuated associations after controlling for adult socioeconomic factors and social support in adulthood. Conclusions: Cumulative ACE exposure is associated with lower adult resilience among women, independent of adult socioeconomic factors and social support, indicating that adult resilience may be largely determined in childhood. Funding: This work was supported by the European Research Council (Consolidator grant; UAV, grant number 726413), and the Icelandic Center for Research (Grant of excellence; UAV, grant number 163362-051). HBD was supported by a doctoral grant from the University of Iceland Research Fund.

Description:

© 2022, Daníelsdóttir et al. Funding Information: Funding: This work was supported by the European Research Council (Consolidator grant; UAV, grant number 726413), and the Icelandic Center for Research (Grant of excellence; UAV, grant number 163362-051). HBD was supported by a doctoral grant from the University of Iceland Research Fund. Funding Information: This work was supported by the European Research Council (UAV, grant number 726413), and the Icelandic Center for Research (Grant of excellence; UAV, grant number 163362?051). HBD was supported by a doctoral grant from the University of Iceland Research Fund. The funders had no role in study design, data collection and interpretation, or the decision to submit the work for publication.Funder Grant reference number Author Icelandic Centre for Research H2020 European Research Council Icelandic Centre for Research Doctoral grant Consolidator grant grant number 726413 Grant of excellence grant number 163362-051 Hilda Bj?rk Dan?elsd?ttir Unnur Anna Valdimarsd?ttir Unnur Anna Valdimarsd?ttir The funders had no role in study design, data collection and interpretation, or the decision to submit the work for publication. Funding Information: Funding This work was supported by the European Research Council (UAV, grant number 726413), and the Icelandic Center for Research (Grant of excellence; UAV, grant number 163362–051). HBD was supported by a doctoral grant from the University of Iceland Research Fund. The funders had no role in study design, data collection and interpretation, or the decision to submit the work for publication. Publisher Copyright: © Daníelsdóttir et al.

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