Opin vísindi

MercuNorth–monitoring mercury in pregnant women from the Arctic as a baseline to assess the effectiveness of the Minamata Convention

MercuNorth–monitoring mercury in pregnant women from the Arctic as a baseline to assess the effectiveness of the Minamata Convention


Title: MercuNorth–monitoring mercury in pregnant women from the Arctic as a baseline to assess the effectiveness of the Minamata Convention
Author: Adlard, Bryan
Lemire, Mélanie
Bonefeld-Jørgensen, Eva C.
Long, Manhai
Ólafsdóttir, Kristín
Odland, Jon O.
Rautio, Arja
Myllynen, Päivi
Sandanger, Torkjel M.
Dudarev, Alexey A.
... 4 more authors Show all authors
Date: 2021
Language: English
Scope:
Department: Faculty of Medicine
Series: International Journal of Circumpolar Health; 80(1)
ISSN: 1239-9736
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1080/22423982.2021.1881345
Subject: Meðganga; Norðurslóðir; Lífvöktun; Norðurslóðir; Lífvöktun; Kvikasilfur; Arctic; biomonitoring; Mercury; Minamata Convention; Epidemiology; Health (social science); Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
URI: https://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11815/2834

Show full item record

Citation:

Adlard , B , Lemire , M , Bonefeld-Jørgensen , E C , Long , M , Ólafsdóttir , K , Odland , J O , Rautio , A , Myllynen , P , Sandanger , T M , Dudarev , A A , Bergdahl , I A , Wennberg , M , Berner , J & Ayotte , P 2021 , ' MercuNorth–monitoring mercury in pregnant women from the Arctic as a baseline to assess the effectiveness of the Minamata Convention ' , International Journal of Circumpolar Health , vol. 80 , no. 1 , 1881345 . https://doi.org/10.1080/22423982.2021.1881345

Abstract:

Exposure to mercury (Hg) is a global concern, particularly among Arctic populations that rely on the consumption of marine mammals and fish which are the main route of Hg exposure for Arctic populations.The MercuNorth project was created to establish baseline Hg levels across several Arctic regions during the period preceding the Minamata Convention. Blood samples were collected from 669 pregnant women, aged 18–44 years, between 2010 and 2016 from sites across the circumpolar Arctic including Alaska (USA), Nunavik (Canada), Greenland, Iceland, Norway, Sweden, Northern Lapland (Finland) and Murmansk Oblast (Russia). Descriptive statistics were calculated, multiple pairwise comparisons were made between regions, and unadjusted linear trend analyses were performed.Geometric mean concentrations of total Hg were highest in Nunavik (5.20 µg/L)  and Greenland (3.79 µg/L), followed by Alaska (2.13 µg/L), with much lower concentrations observed in the other regions (ranged between 0.48 and 1.29 µg/L). In Nunavik, Alaska and Greenland, blood Hg concentrations have decreased significantly since 1992, 2000 and 2010 respectively with % annual decreases of 4.7%, 7.5% and 2.7%, respectively.These circumpolar data combined with fish and marine mammal consumption data can be used for assessing long-term Hg trends and the effectiveness of the Minamata Convention.

Description:

Funding text #1 The authors would like to thank Dr Eric Dewailly for his vision and leadership on the initiation of this MercuNorth project. The MercuNorth project was an international collaboration, and we would like to acknowledge and thank all study participants and regional partners, including all participating university personnel and hospital staff, with a special thanks to Mr Anders Ruuth from Sunderby Hospital and personnel at Kiruna Hospital, Sweden, and personnel at Landakot University Hospital, Reykjavik. We would also like to thank Elhadji A. Laouan Sidi and Caty Blanchette for statistical analyses, and thank Anna Lukina, Ron Garson and Catherine Girard for their assistance with graphics. We would also like to acknowledge funding for this project which came from multiple sources across the Arctic, including a grant from the Nordic Council of Ministers (project #14137), funding from the Swedish Environmental Protection Agency and the Danish Environmental Agency. Samples from Finland and Russia were collected and funded through the Kolarctic ENPI CBC 2007-2013 project (KO467) “Food and Health Security in the Norwegian, Russian and Finnish border regions: linking local industries, communities and socio-economic impacts”. Funding text #2 This work was supported by the Nordic Council of Ministers [Project #14137]; Swedish Environmental Protection Agency [n/a]; Kolarctic ENPI CBC 2007-2013 programme [n/a]; Danish Environmental Agency [n/a]. The authors would like to thank Dr Eric Dewailly for his vision and leadership on the initiation of this MercuNorth project. The MercuNorth project was an international collaboration, and we would like to acknowledge and thank all study participants and regional partners, including all participating university personnel and hospital staff, with a special thanks to Mr Anders Ruuth from Sunderby Hospital and personnel at Kiruna Hospital, Sweden, and personnel at Landakot University Hospital, Reykjavik. We would also like to thank Elhadji A. Laouan Sidi and Caty Blanchette for statistical analyses, and thank Anna Lukina, Ron Garson and Catherine Girard for their assistance with graphics. We would also like to acknowledge funding for this project which came from multiple sources across the Arctic, including a grant from the Nordic Council of Ministers (project #14137), funding from the Swedish Environmental Protection Agency and the Danish Environmental Agency. Samples from Finland and Russia were collected and funded through the Kolarctic ENPI CBC 2007-2013 project (KO467) Food and Health Security in the Norwegian, Russian and Finnish border regions: linking local industries, communities and socio-economic impacts. Publisher Copyright: © 2021 The Author(s). Published by Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group.

Files in this item

This item appears in the following Collection(s)