Opin vísindi

Proceedings of the 10th Háskóli Íslands Student Conference on the Medieval North (Reykjavík, April 15–17, 2021)

Proceedings of the 10th Háskóli Íslands Student Conference on the Medieval North (Reykjavík, April 15–17, 2021)


Title: Proceedings of the 10th Háskóli Íslands Student Conference on the Medieval North (Reykjavík, April 15–17, 2021)
Author: Mikaelsdóttir, Katrín Lísa L.
Lummer, Felix   orcid.org/0000-0002-6867-8921
Westcoat, Eirik   orcid.org/0000-0003-1232-0418
Mueller, Ermenegilda Rachel
Panaro, Luca Arruns
Pokorny, Lea Debora
Zorzan, Giulia
Date: 2021
Language: English
Scope: 64
Department: Faculty of Icelandic and Comparative Cultural Studies
Faculty of History and Philosophy
ISBN: 978-9935-25-095-7
Subject: Miðaldafræði; Íslendingasögur; Sagnfræði; Fornleifafræði; Medival studies
URI: https://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11815/2724

Show full item record

Citation:

Mikaelsdóttir , K L L , Lummer , F , Westcoat , E , Mueller , E R , Panaro , L A , Pokorny , L D & Zorzan , G 2021 , Proceedings of the 10th Háskóli Íslands Student Conference on the Medieval North (Reykjavík, April 15–17, 2021) . vol. 10 , University of Iceland Centre for Medieval Studies .

Abstract:

The Háskoli Íslands Student Conference on the Medieval North was established in 2011 as an annual international and interdisciplinary forum for graduate students of Old Norse and broadly defined Medieval Scandinavia including but not limited to Archaeology, History, (Comparative) Literature, Old Nordic Religion, Linguistics, Editing and Digitisation, Codicology, Manuscript Transmission, Gender and Queer Studies, Ludology, and Modern Reception Studies. The conference is organised by Early Career Researchers and postgraduate students and at the University of Iceland. In recent years, the Háskóli Íslands Student Conference on the Medieval North has become a successful event with a steadily growing number of attendees. As the conference was held for the tenth time from April 15–17, 2021, we were delighted to expand the conference to a three-day online event on Zoom and Twitch and to introduce several new initiatives including a virtual exhibition of 14 posters, two keynote lectures, a manuscript showcase and a workshop on bookmaking and illuminated manuscripts. The conference comprised papers and posters from 51 graduate students and Early Career Researchers affiliated with 29 universities and institutions in 15 countries. These proceedings compile selected abstracts from the event in a more easily accessible format. The papers and posters at the conference showed a variety of novel research in the field of Medieval Norse Studies. Among the wide range of diverse, interdisciplinary topics, an encompassing question became evident: How do our interactions with the past shape the present and the future of research and us as researchers? Three key themes emerged: First, a significant number of papers engaged with the layers that comprise cultural identity, in particular, how it is created, how it impacts the relationship between individuals and communities, and what we can learn from it. Some speakers considered the internal and external perception of Old Norse culture, people and language, most notably regarding ability and disability, supernatural entities, and other marginalised groups. Some speakers focused on abstract concepts, for instance,dreams, performance, memory, and emotions, while others explored the changing image of Old Norse concepts in postmodern literature, media, and games. Second, several papers demonstrated instances of exciting technologies, such as LiDAR DEMs, 3D models, databases and mapping tools that can be useful contributions to our understanding of the Old Norse world. This trend underlines the increasing importance of Digital Humanities. Third, particularly the two keynote lectures and concluding conference reception presented strategies for Early Career Researchers to discuss how we can benefit from the knowledge and understanding of the Medieval North, and how to use it to develop our professional careers and build networks. Both keynote speakers, Dr Beeke Stegmann and Dr Luke John Murphy gave significant insights into the different possible pathways of academic careers by sharing their personal journeys with the audience. The organising committee would like to thank all participants of the 10th Háskóli Íslands Student Conference on the Medieval North. We would also like to thank the sponsors of the conference for their generous support, particularly Enkon A/S, Reykjavík UNESCO City of Literature, and Rimmugýgur, and we are grateful for the following institutions and universities which have been providing facilities, refreshments, and other resources for many years: The University of Iceland Centre for Medieval Studies (Miðaldastofan), the Centre for Research in the Humanities (Hugvísindastofnun), and the Árni Magnússon Institute for Icelandic Studies. In addition, we extend our gratitude to a number of individuals without whom the 10th Háskóli Íslands Student Conference on the Medieval North would not have been possible: We thank Haraldur Bernharðsson (University of Iceland) for his continued support and advice throughout the process of planning and holding the conference as well as his assistance with this e-book. We are grateful for Guðvarður Már Gunnlaugsson and Vasarė Rastonis (Stofnun Árna Magnússonar í íslenskum fræðum) for allowing us to showcase three manuscripts in the Arnamagnæan collection, GKS 2365 4to, AM 350 fol., and AM 132 fol. We also appreciate the work of Liv Marit Mathilde Aurdal (Snorrastofa) and Beth Rogers (University of Iceland) and thank them for their involvement with the initial planning of the conference. Lastly, we would like to express our sincere gratitude to Beeke Stegmann and Luke John Murphy who not only organised the first Háskóli Íslands Student Conference on the Medieval North, but also significantly enriched the anniversary conference in April 2021 with their insightful keynotes on strategies, opportunities, and overcoming challenges in Early Research Careers. The 11th Háskóli Íslands Student Conference on the Medieval North will take place online and at the University of Iceland on April 7–9, 2022. We hope to see you at a future event!

Files in this item

This item appears in the following Collection(s)