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Influence of Day Length and Physical Activity on Sleep Patterns in Older Icelandic Men and Women

Influence of Day Length and Physical Activity on Sleep Patterns in Older Icelandic Men and Women


Title: Influence of Day Length and Physical Activity on Sleep Patterns in Older Icelandic Men and Women
Author: Brychta, Robert J.
Arnardottir, Nanna Yr
Johannsson, Erlingur
Wright, Elizabeth C.
Eiriksdottir, Gudny   orcid.org/0000-0002-8197-0652
Gudnason, Vilmundur   orcid.org/0000-0001-5696-0084
Marinac, Catherine R.
Davis, Megan
Koster, Annemarie
Caserotti, Paolo
... 3 more authors Show all authors
Date: 2016-02-15
Language: English
Scope: 11
School: School of Health Sciences
Series: Journal of Clinical Sleep Medicine; 12(2)
ISSN: 1550-9389
DOI: https://doi.org/10.5664/jcsm.5486
Subject: Svefn; Öldrun; Lífsgæði; Aging; Accelerometer; Physical activity; Sleep; Seasonal
URI: https://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11815/2583

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Citation:

Brychta , R J , Arnardottir , N Y , Johannsson , E , Wright , E C , Eiriksdottir , G , Gudnason , V , Marinac , C R , Davis , M , Koster , A , Caserotti , P , Sveinsson , T , Harris , T & Chen , K Y 2016 , ' Influence of Day Length and Physical Activity on Sleep Patterns in Older Icelandic Men and Women ' , Journal of Clinical Sleep Medicine , vol. 12 , no. 2 , pp. 203-213 . https://doi.org/10.5664/jcsm.5486

Abstract:

Study Objectives: To identify cross-sectional and seasonal patterns of sleep and physical activity (PA) in community-dwelling, older Icelandic adults using accelerometers. Methods: A seven-day free-living protocol of 244 (110 female) adults aged 79.7 ± 4.9 years was conducted as part of a larger population-based longitudinal observational-cohort study in the greater Reykjavik area of Iceland. A subpopulation (n = 72) repeated the 7-day measurement during seasonal periods with greater (13.4 ± 1.4 h) and lesser (7.7 ± 1.8 h) daylight. Results: Cross-sectional analyses using multiple linear regression models revealed that day length was a significant independent predictor of sleep duration, mid-sleep, and rise time (all p < 0.05). However, the actual within-individual differences in sleep patterns of the repeaters were rather subtle between periods of longer and shorter day-lengths. Compared to women, men had a shorter sleep duration (462 ± 80 vs. 487 ± 68 minutes, p = 0.008), earlier rise time, and a greater number of awakenings per night (46.5 ± 18.3 vs. 40.2 ± 15.7, p = 0.007), but sleep efficiency and onset latency were similar between the two sexes. Daily PA was also similar between men and women and between periods of longer and shorter day-lengths. BMI, age, gender, and overall PA all contributed to the variations in sleep parameters using multiple regression analysis. Conclusions: The sleep and PA characteristics of this unique population revealed some gender differences, but there was limited variation in response to significant daylight changes which may be due to long-term adaptation.

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