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Zonulin‐dependent intestinal permeability in children diagnosed with mental disorders : A systematic review and meta‐analysis

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dc.contributor Landspitali - The National University Hospital of Iceland
dc.contributor.author Asbjornsdottir, Birna
dc.contributor.author Snorradottir, Heiddis
dc.contributor.author Andresdottir, Edda
dc.contributor.author Fasano, Alessio
dc.contributor.author Lauth, Bertrand
dc.contributor.author Gudmundsson, Larus S.
dc.contributor.author Gottfredsson, Magnus
dc.contributor.author Halldorsson, Thorhallur Ingi
dc.contributor.author Birgisdottir, Bryndis Eva
dc.date.accessioned 2022-09-06T01:01:48Z
dc.date.available 2022-09-06T01:01:48Z
dc.date.issued 2020-07-03
dc.identifier.citation Asbjornsdottir , B , Snorradottir , H , Andresdottir , E , Fasano , A , Lauth , B , Gudmundsson , L S , Gottfredsson , M , Halldorsson , T I & Birgisdottir , B E 2020 , ' Zonulin‐dependent intestinal permeability in children diagnosed with mental disorders : A systematic review and meta‐analysis ' , Nutrients , vol. 12 , no. 7 , 1982 . https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12071982 , https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12071982
dc.identifier.issn 2072-6643
dc.identifier.other PURE: 12104940
dc.identifier.other PURE UUID: 786ca759-9c08-4f6a-8c51-1dbb82d22167
dc.identifier.other researchoutputwizard: hdl.handle.net/20.500.11815/2307
dc.identifier.other Scopus: 85087566114
dc.identifier.uri https://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11815/3420
dc.description Publisher Copyright: © 2020 by the authors. Licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland.
dc.description.abstract Worldwide, up to 20% of children and adolescents experience mental disorders, which are the leading cause of disability in young people. Research shows that serum zonulin levels are associated with increased intestinal permeability (IP), affecting neural, hormonal, and immunological pathways. This systematic review and meta‐analysis aimed to summarize evidence from observational studies on IP in children diagnosed with mental disorders. The review follows the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta‐Analyses (PRISMA) guidelines. A systematic search of the Cochrane Library, PsycINFO, PubMed, and the Web of Science identified 833 records. Only non‐intervention (i.e., observational) studies in children (<18 years) diagnosed with mental disorders, including a relevant marker of intestinal permeability, were included. Five studies were selected, with the risk of bias assessed according to the Newcastle–Ottawa scale (NOS). Four articles were identified as strong and one as moderate, representing altogether 402 participants providing evidence on IP in children diagnosed with attention deficit and hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), autism spectrum disorder (ASD), and obsessive–compulsive disorder (OCD). In ADHD, elevated serum zonulin levels were associated with impaired social functioning compared to controls. Children with ASD may be predisposed to impair intestinal barrier function, which may contribute to their symptoms and clinical outcome compared to controls. Children with ASD, who experience gastro‐intestinal (GI) symptoms, seem to have an imbalance in their immune response. However, in children with OCD, serum zonulin levels were not significantly different compared to controls, but serum claudin‐5, a transmembrane tight‐junction protein, was significantly higher. A meta‐analysis of mean zonulin plasma levels of patients and control groups revealed a significant difference between groups (p = 0.001), including the four studies evaluating the full spectrum of the zonulin peptide family. Therefore, further studies are required to better understand the complex role of barrier function, i.e., intestinal and blood–brain barrier, and of inflammation, to the pathophysiology in mental and neurodevelopmental disorders. This review was PROSPERO preregistered, (162208).
dc.format.extent 27
dc.format.extent
dc.language.iso en
dc.relation info:eu-repo/grantAgreement/EC/H2020/825033
dc.relation info:eu-repo/grantAgreement/EC/H2020/825033
dc.relation.ispartofseries Nutrients; 12(7)
dc.rights info:eu-repo/semantics/openAccess
dc.subject Food Science
dc.subject Adolescents
dc.subject Attention deficit and hyperactivity disorder
dc.subject ADHD
dc.subject Autism spectrum disorder
dc.subject Haptoglobin
dc.subject Intestinal permeability
dc.subject Matvælafræði
dc.subject Unglingar
dc.subject Einhverfa
dc.subject Áráttu- og þráhyggjuröskun
dc.subject Næringarfræði
dc.subject Food Science
dc.subject Adolescents
dc.subject Attention deficit and hyperactivity disorder
dc.subject ADHD
dc.subject Autism spectrum disorder
dc.subject Haptoglobin
dc.subject Intestinal permeability
dc.subject Matvælafræði
dc.subject Unglingar
dc.subject Einhverfa
dc.subject Áráttu- og þráhyggjuröskun
dc.subject Næringarfræði
dc.subject Food Science
dc.subject Nutrition and Dietetics
dc.title Zonulin‐dependent intestinal permeability in children diagnosed with mental disorders : A systematic review and meta‐analysis
dc.type /dk/atira/pure/researchoutput/researchoutputtypes/contributiontojournal/systematicreview
dc.description.version Peer reviewed
dc.identifier.pmid 32635367
dc.identifier.doi https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12071982
dc.relation.url http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85087566114&partnerID=8YFLogxK
dc.contributor.department Faculty of Medicine
dc.contributor.department Women's and Childrens's Services
dc.contributor.department Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences
dc.contributor.department Other departments
dc.contributor.department Faculty of Food Science and Nutrition


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