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“I’m a winner, not a victim” : The facilitating factors of post-traumatic growth among women who have suffered intimate partner violence

“I’m a winner, not a victim” : The facilitating factors of post-traumatic growth among women who have suffered intimate partner violence


Title: “I’m a winner, not a victim” : The facilitating factors of post-traumatic growth among women who have suffered intimate partner violence
Author: Bryngeirsdóttir, Hulda Sædís
Halldórsdóttir, Sigríður
Date: 2022-01-25
Language: English
Scope: 18
School: School of Health Sciences
Department: Doctoral program center
Series: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health; 19(3)
ISSN: 1661-7827
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19031342
Subject: Ofbeldi gegn konum; Líðan; Heilsuefling; Endurhæfing; Post-traumatic growth; Intimate partner violence; Gender-based violence; Trauma recovery; Healing; Rehabilitation; Women's health
URI: https://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11815/3168

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Citation:

Bryngeirsdóttir , H S & Halldórsdóttir , S 2022 , ' “I’m a winner, not a victim” : The facilitating factors of post-traumatic growth among women who have suffered intimate partner violence ' , International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health , vol. 19 , no. 3 , 1342 . https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19031342

Abstract:

Post-traumatic growth (PTG) is a positive psychological change following trauma. Intimate partner violence (IPV) is one such trauma. The aim of this phenomenological study was to explore PTG from the perspective of women who have survived IPV as well as their perceptions of PTG. Twenty-two female IPV survivors aged 23–56 who reached PTG, according to the working definition used, were interviewed. The overriding theme of the study was “I’m a winner, not a victim”, which describes the essence of the women’s experience of PTG. They described their experience as a shift from being suffering victims of IPV to becoming winners who enjoyed PTG. They felt that their positive attitude and personal strengths had helped them to reach PTG as well as to face the fact that they had been in an abusive relationship, thus forgiving and believing in themselves and taking responsibility for their own health and well-being. They sought knowledge about violence, how to process it, and how to respond to triggers. They set boundaries for their perpetrators and were in as little contact with them as possible. They chose the company of positive, supportive, and constructive people and situations where they were not being controlled. It was concluded that, even though suffering IPV is a terrible experience that no one should endure, the participants’ experiences had resulted in PTG that they treasured.

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