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Predictors of university nursing students burnout at the time of the COVID-19 pandemic : A cross-sectional study

Predictors of university nursing students burnout at the time of the COVID-19 pandemic : A cross-sectional study


Title: Predictors of university nursing students burnout at the time of the COVID-19 pandemic : A cross-sectional study
Author: Sveinsdóttir, Herdís   orcid.org/0000-0002-1766-3543
Flygenring, Birna Guðrún
Svavarsdóttir, Margrét Hrönn   orcid.org/0000-0001-6609-6808
Thorsteinsson, Hrund Scheving
Kristófersson, Gísli Kort
Bernharðsdóttir, Jóhanna
Svavarsdóttir, Erla Kolbrún
Date: 2021-11
Language: English
Scope:
University/Institute: University of Akureyri
Department: Faculty of Nursing
Other departments
Office of Division of Clinical Services I
Series: Nurse Education Today; 106()
ISSN: 0260-6917
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.nedt.2021.105070
Subject: COVID-19; Hjúkrunarfræði; Háskólanemar; Streita; Kulnun; Burnout; COVID-19 pandemic; Nursing students; Stress; Nursing (all); Education
URI: https://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11815/3001

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Citation:

Sveinsdóttir , H , Flygenring , B G , Svavarsdóttir , M H , Thorsteinsson , H S , Kristófersson , G K , Bernharðsdóttir , J & Svavarsdóttir , E K 2021 , ' Predictors of university nursing students burnout at the time of the COVID-19 pandemic : A cross-sectional study ' , Nurse Education Today , vol. 106 , 105070 . https://doi.org/10.1016/j.nedt.2021.105070

Abstract:

 
Background Little is known about the stress and burnout experienced by undergraduate and graduate nursing students during the COVID-19 pandemic. Academic burnout among nursing students can have an impact on students' learning ability, health, and wellbeing and on the quality of care and intention to leave the profession post-graduation. Objectives Evaluate the predictors of nursing students' personal, academic, and collaboration-related burnout during the COVID-19 pandemic. Design Cross-sectional two-site study. Settings Icelandic universities offering nursing education. Participants Graduate and undergraduate nursing students in Iceland (N = 1044) were asked to participate in the study, with a response rate of 32.7%. Methods An online survey was used to evaluate the students' stress and burnout in spring 2020. Results The main findings show that 51% of the variability in the students' personal burnout was explained by their perceived stress, mental health, and perceived support. Furthermore, the students' perceived stress, support, and educational levels predicted 42% of the variability in their academic burnout. Burnout related to collaborating with fellow-students was explained by the nursing students' physical health and by their educational level, explaining 6% of the variability in fellow-students burnout. Conclusion University administrators might consider adding academic support facilities into their undergraduate nursing programs and teaching their students healthy coping skills.
 
Background: Little is known about the stress and burnout experienced by undergraduate and graduate nursing students during the COVID-19 pandemic. Academic burnout among nursing students can have an impact on students' learning ability, health, and wellbeing and on the quality of care and intention to leave the profession post-graduation. Objectives: Evaluate the predictors of nursing students' personal, academic, and collaboration-related burnout during the COVID-19 pandemic. Design: Cross-sectional two-site study. Settings: Icelandic universities offering nursing education. Participants: Graduate and undergraduate nursing students in Iceland (N = 1044) were asked to participate in the study, with a response rate of 32.7%. Methods: An online survey was used to evaluate the students' stress and burnout in spring 2020. Results: The main findings show that 51% of the variability in the students' personal burnout was explained by their perceived stress, mental health, and perceived support. Furthermore, the students' perceived stress, support, and educational levels predicted 42% of the variability in their academic burnout. Burnout related to collaborating with fellow-students was explained by the nursing students' physical health and by their educational level, explaining 6% of the variability in fellow-students burnout. Conclusion: University administrators might consider adding academic support facilities into their undergraduate nursing programs and teaching their students healthy coping skills.
 

Description:

Funding Information: The study was funded by the scientific funds of the University of Iceland and University of Akureyri . Publisher Copyright: © 2021 The Authors

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